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Article: Seven Ways to Put Juice Back Into Your Job Related Resources

Seven Ways to Put Juice Back Into Your Job
by Elizabeth Lengyel

When you received the news that you got your new job, were you excited about your bright future? Are you still excited and engaged by the work you do today? Do you show up with passion and vitality, ready to achieve higher goals?

If you feel dissatisfied at work, you're not alone.

• USA Today reported in January 2007 that more than 4 out of 5 workers don't have their dream jobs, which people describe as work that is fun and engaging.

• According to a 2006 Statistics Canada report, more than one million Canadians (roughly 1 in 12 people) said they weren't happy at work.

• A 2005 ExecuNet survey revealed that corporate leaders change companies every 3.6 years, down from 4.1 years in 2002. Many occupations have an even shorter tenure.

Many people hope that getting a new job will put the bounce back into their step. Here lies the fallacy. A new workplace won't always provide the job satisfaction, growth, and opportunities you crave. I like to say the grass isn't greener on the other side; the grass is always greenest where you water it most.

Here are seven ways you can juice your career and, perhaps, your current job:

1. Determine what needs to change - Do you need to change your career direction, your job, or your workplace? If you're in the wrong career field, it's time to dig deeper and take an introspective look to determine the career that's right for you. If you need to change your job, look for options and opportunities. If your skills and values don't align with your workplace or environment, it's time to polish your resume and get in touch with your network.

2. Revive your energy and enthusiasm - Know what ignites and motivates you. There are two types of energy: physical and emotional. How can you maximize your physical and emotional energy? Review your personal lifestyle and habits regarding diet, fitness, and fun. Identify toxic people who drag you down and stay away from them. Find the energizing cheerleaders in your life.

3. Practice positive work choice - Decide what you really want from your career, your job, and your days. Think about how you want to be perceived at work. Listen to how you talk to others. Do you see the glass as half-empty or half full? Is your glass overflowing? Let go of negative reactions to others' requests. For example, change your response from "I can't do that until ..." to "I'll be able to do this when ..." Positive talk and actions reap positive outcomes.

4. Choose to have a sense of humor - For your own health and wellbeing, instill laughter and humor into your work life, making sure your lighthearted comments and funny jokes are appropriate, tasteful, and timely. You can choose to get out of your funk and to react to situations with humor. As the saying goes, "It's better to laugh than cry."

5. Be self-worthy - Learn how to blow your own horn gracefully. Don't be boastful; just tell it like it is. It's okay to be proud of yourself and your achievements. Walk tall. Don't slouch.

6. Nurture strong relationships - High interpersonal skills are required in today's workplace. Practice your listening and empathy skills. Make a point of meeting and getting to know new people in your workplace. Get connected. Engage in meaningful conversations beyond weather and sports. Take the spotlight off you, reach out, and help others.

7. Tag, you're it! - Regardless of your age, cultural background, professional level, or industry, you must stay engaged and juiced for career growth and development. Remember, you are responsible for your own career. Be your own career strategist.

Robert Barner, author of Lifeboat Strategies, says, "Today's employer cannot guarantee the stability and longevity of corporate career paths or the security of employees' jobs. As a result, career strategists realize they have to have the initiative in charting their own direction."

You're the only one who can put the juice back into your job and your career. It's all a matter of choice. In fact, you'll discover that you are juiced simply by deciding to take charge of your career.


© Copyright - Elizabeth M. Lengyel, PeopleCoach, Inc. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.

Visit http://PeopleCoach.com to receive Career Boost, a free 7-part audio program, and to hear her invigorating weekly radio show: Career Juice! Refresh & Revitalize Your Work.

Elizabeth Lengyel may be contacted at http://www.peoplecoach.com Elizabeth@PeopleCoach.com

Elizabeth M. Lengyel, President of PeopleCoach, Inc., delivers career breakthroughs. A trusted career coach, Elizabeth is passionate about helping ambitious professionals get juiced about their careers. The result? The right job in the career you love.



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Dec-09-2016

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