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Top Tips for Designing Your Workshop or Teleclass
by Rhonda Hess


Designing (and delivering!) your own workshops and teleclasses is a great way to leverage your time, build credibility with your target market and expand into teaching and facilitation -- two gateway skills.

If you've never designed an educational program before, it may seem like a major undertaking. The truth is -- it's easy! And you can model your program on workshops and teleclass you've experienced. Then, put your flair and finesse into it as you go.

What's the difference between workshops and teleclass?

A workshop is a live event held in person.

A teleclass is a workshop held on a telephone bridgeline.

One of the downsides to workshops is that the room rental and refreshments can run you several hundred dollars. Also you'll spend more time delivering the program because of drive time and minor room set up, hello's and goodbyes. On the other hand, the live meet and greet may help you make a stronger impression, if you're good at networking.

If you're just getting started, consider the teleclass option -- there's no overhead and the phone provides a nice buffer between you and your audience, while it also allows people from all over the world to participate. FreeConferencePro.com is a great free telebridge service.

Whether you're doing a workshop or teleclass, the content can be almost identical with the exception of some tweaks that need to be made for conducting group interaction and exercises over the phone.

Consider building into the price a little one on one time with you. Once your clients have a taste of your expertise and your coaching, they will want more.

Here are Karyn's expert tips for designing your program:

Tip # 1

Design a topic and key points that help solve your target markets top challenges.

The best way to find out what they need is to ask. Do your research! Without research, you may put in a lot of effort but not attract pre-qualified leads to your event that lead to 1:1 coaching or other sales.

(If this does happen, don't give up, just tweak the event!)

Tip # 2

Create an extraordinary lesson plan.

Outline what order that you'll present each key point, exercises and other ways to illustrate and help your audience integrate the learning.

Tip # 3

PRACTICE!!!

Practice running through your program. Allow for Q&A, short side tracks, attendees' enthusiasm! Be sure you have not planned too much for the time frame you have. Nothing aggravates attendees more that if you start late and end late.

Consider giving a pilot program for free or half price. Be clear with your audience that you're doing this in order to get their feedback. People love to have an impact on your design. And, if you word it right -- "I'm offering my list this special pilot price . . . " -- they'll feel they got a deal just for knowing you.

Use their feedback to tweak your program for your full price audience.

And here's Karyn's bonus tips!

Test your pricing.

The biggest mistake most new facilitators make is pricing their program too low. A higher value is often perceived when the price is higher. Check those scarcity beliefs if you're undervaluing your expertise!

On the other hand, you must be sure that your topic is something that will draw for the price you set. This all comes back to Tip # 1 and the research you do about your target market's top challenges and end goals. If you can help them solve problems, make more money, find more time or let go of hassles, they'll value you and your program.

Handle learning expectations upfront.

Every adult comes with their own educational history, learning style and expectations. Sometimes it's harder to satisfy adults. Ask them what they are hoping to get out of this class at the start. Then do your best to provide that.

Sometimes, you may need to say that there won't be time to cover certain topics. That will help them feel heard and you can often guide them to other classes, products or 1:1 coaching to answer their inquiries. You'll clear what is floating around in their heads so they can truly focus and everyone's expectations will be met.

Get started now!

It's too easy to put off starting your own workshop or teleclass month after month and even year after year. You lose out on a great revenue booster and your prospects miss out on a way to build a relationship with you that could lead to long term loyalty and great satisfaction.


Rhonda Hess may be contacted at http://www.prosperouscoachblog.com rhonda@prosperouscoach.com

For more advice on how to market less and coach more clients, visit the Prosperous Coach blog. Rhonda Hess is the founder of Prosperous Coach, an online community supporting coaches to Champion Your Ideal Coaching Market and build a soul-satisfying coaching business from the ground up.


 


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Dec-03-2016




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