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Article: Trust In Workplace Stabilized In Past Two Years Related Resources

Trust In Workplace Stabilized In Past Two Years,
According To Survey By Right Management

Trust Is Best Between Employees & Their Supervisors


More than 7 out of 10 organizations say trust in the workplace has either improved or remained steady during the past two years, according to a survey by Right Management. Only one-third said workplace trust has declined in the last two years.


37 percent of 202 organizations responding to the survey said the level of trust has remained the same in their workplaces during the past two years. 34 percent said trust levels have improved, and 29 percent said trust has declined.


“Trust in the workplace seems to have stabilized or improved in recent years after hitting a low point in the 1990s,” said Doug Matthews, Executive Vice President, Operations, for Right Management, a leading global provider of integrated consulting solutions across the employment lifecycle. “A high level of trust in the workplace is sometimes not valued enough by organizations. Trust motivates employees to perform at their highest potential, and helps increase their loyalty and retention.”


The level of trust in the workplace is best between front-line employees and their supervisors, while the level of trust is worst between front-line employees and top-level management, according to the survey.


“Immediate supervisors who are in daily contact with employees find it easier to stay connected with them,” said Matthews. “Top-level managers are more likely to be disconnected from lower organizational levels, and this, unfortunately, can lead to employee disengagement.” Only one-third of employees in a typical organization are fully engaged in their jobs, according to another survey by Right Management.


According to the survey results, the top ways for managers and executives to build trust with employees are by: showing respect for fellow employees as equal partners; being honest; and maintaining integrity.


However, the top ways for managers and executives to lose employees’ trust are by: lying or telling half-truths; acting inconsistently in what they say and do; and withholding information.


Among the survey’s findings:


During the past two years, workplace trust has:
· Remained the same (according to 37 percent of respondents)
· Increased (34 percent)
· Decreased (29 percent)


Trust in the workplace is best between:
· Front-line employees and their supervisors (46 percent)
· Middle managers and top-level executives (19 percent)
· Supervisors and middle managers (13 percent)
· Front-line employees and middle managers (10 percent)
· Front-line employees and top-level managers (8 percent)
· Supervisors and top-level executives (2 percent)


Trust in the workplace is worst between:
· Front-line employees and top-level management (33 percent)
· Front-line employees and their supervisors (22 percent)
· Middle managers and top-level executives (15 percent)
· Supervisors and top-level executives (11 percent)
· Front-line employees and middle managers (10 percent)
· Supervisors and middle managers (5 percent)


The top ways for managers and executives to build employees’ trust are:
· Showing respect for fellow employees as equal partners (57 percent)
· Being honest (52 percent)
· Maintaining integrity (47 percent)
· Engaging people in vision and strategy (36 percent)
· Sharing information (30 percent)
· Being committed to developing people (21 percent)
· Doing the right thing regardless of personal risk (17 percent)
· Focusing on shared goals more than personal agendas (15 percent)


The top ways that managers and executives lose employees’ trust are by:
· Lying or telling half-truths (64 percent)
· Acting inconsistently in what they say and do (61 percent)
· Withholding information (36 percent)
· Displaying a demeaning attitude (22 percent)
· Failing to develop subordinates (19 percent)
· Seeking personal gain above shared gain (18 percent)
· Rigid and inflexible behavior (14 percent)
· Being close-minded (14 percent)
· Unpredictability (13 percent)
· Arrogance (13 percent)



About Right Management


Right Management (www.right.com) is a leading global provider of integrated consulting solutions across the employment lifecycle. Right Management helps clients maximize the return on their human capital investments while assisting individuals to achieve their full potential.


Right Management is a wholly owned subsidiary of Manpower, Inc. (NYSE:MAN), a world leader in the employment services industry, creating and delivering services that enable its clients to win in the changing world of work.

 



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